Learning Environments

The learning environment has a strong influence on learning and development, behaviors, engagement, and approaches to learning.

Teachers use what they know about the children to make decisions about which materials and interactions are the most beneficial for the children.

The Role of Learning Environements

Visually appealing, inviting and engaging

  • Organized and intentionally arranged to spark curiosity and engagement
  • Learning materials are accessible and meet the developmental needs of each and every child
  • Promotes discovery and exploration through engaging and thought-provoking materials
  • Equipped with authentic materials that reflect real-life experiences and the curriculum
  • Children’s current work is predominate display

Celebrate the uniqueness of each child and their family

  • Represent children and their families throughout the classroom and school environment in a respectful manner
  • Accommodate diverse family structures, cultures, abilities and backgrounds through representative materials
  • Recognize, invite and encourage children and families to share their language, culture, traditions and special skills, hobbies and interests in the classroom, school and organizational community

Created to promote engagement, stimulate curiosities and encourage expressions of children’s emotions and ideas

  • Designed to maximize choice and promote creativity
  • Daily routine is predictable and consistent but responsive to the interests and needs of children
  • Regularly adjusted, and yet consistent, to reflect current learning objectives, skill levels, interests and needs of the children
  • Materials and space support the expression and identification of all emotions
  • Materials and spaces support successful navigation of independent play and interactions with others

General Classroom Setup

  • The space should be well defined
  • Locate interest areas that are quiet such as library, art, technology, away from noisier ones.
  • Art and Discovery should be near a water source
  • To minimize problems, provide duplicates of basic materials
  • Everything in your classroom should have a designated place
  • When children know where things are and how they are grouped, they can work independently and participate in clean up.
  • Items should be labeled with pictures and words.
  • A physical setting that is safe, attractive, comfortable, and well designed helps children engage in the experiences

Storage Spaces

Personal

Store personal items

Open

Materials you want to make accessible to children

Secure

Materials you want to control

Art

See the Creative Curriculum for Preschool, 6th Edition; Volume 2, pages 76-110
See
the Creative Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers & Twos, 3rd Edition; pages 133-145

Blocks

See the Creative Curriculum for Preschool, 6th Edition; Volume 2, pages 2-28
See the Creative Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers & Twos 3rd Edition; pages 75-85

Discovery

See the Creative Curriculum for Preschool, 6th Edition; Volume 2, pages 140-163
See the Creative Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers & Twos 3rd Edition; pages 166-177

Dramatic Play

See the Creative Curriculum for Preschool, 6th Edition; Volume 2, pages 30-53
See the Creative Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers & Twos 3rd Edition; pages 91-100

Gross Motor

See the Creative Curriculum for Preschool 6th Edition; pages
See the Creative Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers, and Twos 6th Edition; pages 180-194

Library

See the Creative Curriculum for Preschool, 6th Edition; Volume 2, pages 112-139
See the Creative Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers, and twos 6
th Edition; pages 103-119

Music & Movement

See the Creative Curriculum for Preschool, 6th Edition; Volume 2, pages 186-205
See the Creative Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers & Twos 3rd Edition; pages 122-131

Safe Place

Provide a space and materials for one child to help them understand and regulate their emotions.

Sand & Water

See the Creative Curriculum for Preschool, 6th Edition; Volume 2, pages 169-184
See the Creative Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers & Twos 3rd Edition; pages 166-177

Toys & Games

See the Creative Curriculum for Preschool, 6th Edition; Volume 2, pages 54-75
See the Creative Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers & Twos 3rd Edition; pages 72-87

Identity Boards

Identity Boards allow children to see themselves as members of a classroom community.

  • Must be displayed in every Day Early Learning classroom
  • Must represent current student enrollment must include a portrait of the child, the child’s name, birthday and age, and a representation of the child’s work
  • Representations of a child’s work can include a self portrait, a painting, a drawing (of the child’s family or an observational drawing), a child questionnaire all print materials must use Century Gothic must be mounted on black construction paper
  • All print materials must use Century Gothic
  • Must be mounted on black construction paper

Learning Journeys

Learning journeys make the children’s thinking and learning visible. They allow children to plan and reflect as well as show that you value their work. Learning journeys also demonstrate to families what is happening in the classroom and school,

  • must be displayed in every Day Early learning classroom
  • current learning must be represented in the classroom
  • it is acceptable to have historical learning journeys displayed
  • each child’s learning must be represented in the classroom through a learning journey
  • all print materials must use Century Gothic
  • must be mounted on black construction paper
  • must include the Early Learning Foundations that were addressed during the learning
  • must include narration of the learning and photographs
  • Child-made artifacts can enhance the learning journey (e.g. an artistic creation or writing sample)

Most of the display space in your classroom should be used for children’s work

Display children’s work prominently at their eye level

Keep displays simple

Do not write on student’s work Type dictation

Other Ways to Display Learning

How Do We Fix It?

We have to teach children how to respect the classroom materials.

The environment speaks to the child about what to do, how to do it, and what you expect.

Less is more, rotate materials instead of putting them all out at once.