New Study Shows Two-Generational Benefit of Early Childhood Programs

 In Advocacy, News

More Proof of the Two-Generational Impact of Early Learning Programs

A new report on Washington D.C.’s universal preschool program is offering further proof of how early education programs not only positively impact young children, but their parents and the economy as a whole.

In 2009, the nation’s capital began offering universal, full-day preschool through a mix of schools and private programs. With nearly 90 percent of 4-year-olds and 70 percent of 3-year-olds enrolling, the program has been a huge success for children and families.

Along with the educational benefits, the report also finds that the program has allowed many parents to re-enter the labor force or increase the hours they work. This is helping families across the city to achieve greater economic stability and self-sufficiency. Specifically, since 2017, Washington D.C. has seen a 12 percent increase in mothers returning to the workforce, with 10 percent directly attributing their return to the preschool program.

As Indiana businesses struggle to find needed workers in a historically tight labor market, this is a reminder of the two-generational impact early education programs can provide. And, another reason policy makers need to invest in creating these opportunities for more children and families.

The impact of high-quality early education on the economy and workforce will be the topic of next week’s Indiana Early Learning Summit and will be central to efforts to expand Indiana’s investment in the On My Way Pre-K program in the 2019 legislative session.

To read the full report, click here or to access additional information on early learning in Indiana, click here. Please share this information with other advocates and encourage leaders in your community to sign up here to receive these e-updates.

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